Adult Theatre fun - crate training adult

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crate training adult - Adult Theatre fun


Oct 31,  · Build positive associations. Begin by placing treats and maybe a favorite toy or two near the opening of the crate. Praise your dog when he goes near the opening to retrieve an object or treat. Entice your dog inside. Once he's comfortable with getting close to the crate's opening, begin placing treats and toys inside. Begin crate training the day you bring home your new dog. At times when your dog isn’t looking, drop a few treats into the crate. Don’t point them out to him; let him discover the goodies on his own. Feed your dog his meal in the crate using a stuffed KONG. Use heavy string to tie it to the back of the crate, so your dog has to eat it in there.

Jul 18,  · This process works to crate train both adult dogs and puppies. Part 1 – Running into the crate on command and staying in with the door open. Toss a treat into the back of the crate, saying a cue like “Kennel Up!” or “Crate!” in a happy voice. While he’s eating the treat (before he comes out), throw another into the back of the crate. Jun 18,  · Over time, most adult dogs will come to accept a crate with the right training. Use treats Your goal is to make your dog associate the crate with positive feelings, so encourage her to go to the crate by putting treats and even food inside. Eventually she’ll see the crate as the place where good things happen and won’t be as fearful. Make it comfy.

Aug 10,  · Of course there will be exceptions, but generally speaking an adult dog will take longer to crate train than a young puppy. The reasons for this are: Adult dogs don’t learn as quickly as a young puppy and on top of this, they’re quicker to forget things. So more patience and more repetitions are needed before things really sink in. May 02,  · Choose the crate’s materials. “Airplane kennels” (a plastic crate with a metal door) or metal wire-type crates are typically the best — especially for a puppy or adult dog just starting their crate training. These materials are typically sturdier and easier to clean than the cloth-type crates.

It's important to keep two things in mind while crate training: The crate should always be associated with something pleasant and training should take place in a series of small steps. Don't go too fast. Step 1: Introduce your dog to the crate. Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room.